February 19, 1942: A Black Stain on American History


NOTE: Today marks the 71st anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.

The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.

Today,  people around the country say are saying “never again” – and working to resist the same kind of arbitrary power to detain people with no due process written into the 2012 National defense Authorization Act. Washington  state Senator Bob Hasegawa is one of those people. Following is the story of his family’s personal experience with indefinite detention and what he’s trying to do about it today, originally published on the Daily Caller website.

fULL aRTICLE

 

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